5 questions to ask yourself before you quit to be a stay-at-home mom

February 07, 2017
  • “Am I cut out to be a stay-at-home mother?”
    1 / 5 “Am I cut out to be a stay-at-home mother?”

    Caring for kids is a full-time job. Are you prepared to be homebound and have your life revolve solely around your child?

    “This can be tough for women who enjoy the fast pace of the corporate world,” says Linda Teo, country manager at Manpowergroup Singapore

    “If you’re the sort who thrives on career success, you may feel lost if you suddenly remove yourself from your job. So, ask yourself if you’d be able to cope with the adjustment.”

    Related: 10 tips for stay-at-home mum with baby

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  • “Will my family be able to manage financially?”
    2 / 5 “Will my family be able to manage financially?”

    While two incomes are better than one, it doesn’t mean that life has to be difficult if you quit your job, says Linda. It just means that you and your spouse have to adjust your financial expectations. 

    Still, it’s wise to ask yourself if your family is ready to live on less, and how one income will affect your family’s savings in the long term.

    Related: No pay, but I chose to be a stay-at-home mum

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  • “Can I do freelance work or take on a flexible work arrangement instead?”
    3 / 5 “Can I do freelance work or take on a flexible work arrangement instead?”

    Part-time, contract and freelance work are great opportunities to keep your skills relevant and your resume updated, says Amit Puri, managing consultant of Sandbox Advisors, a career management and human resources firm.

    This will help you if you choose to return to the workforce when your kids are older.

    Alternatively, you may want to take on a more flexible work arrangement. These days, many companies let their staff work from home a few days a week, in order to hold on to their employees. 

    Consider these options with your boss and human resources manager before making the decision to quit.

    Related: 6 tips for work-at-home mothers 

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  • “Will my role still be relevant five or 10 years down the road?”
    4 / 5 “Will my role still be relevant five or 10 years down the road?”

    This is an important issue to consider if you plan to return to the workforce later, says Linda.

    “If your role is likely to become obsolete, then you may want to decide on a new career and re-skill yourself for when you do go back to work. If your role is still going to be around, there’s a high chance that it would have evolved substantially by the time you return.

    In this case, it’s essential to upgrade your skills and stay abreast of industry trends.

    You may want to invest in a diploma, degree, or professional course, attend seminars, and join professional organisations, for example. Just try not to lose touch with the corporate world, Linda advises.

    “Continue to network with your peers and do whatever you can to stay competitive.”

    Related: 5 things not to say to stay-at-home mums

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  • “Am I willing to take a pay-cut if I decide to return to the workforce?
    5 / 5 “Am I willing to take a pay-cut if I decide to return to the workforce?

    If you do go back to work after a long break, you may need to adjust your salary expectations, says Linda. 

    Whether you return to the same company or join a new one, it’s unlikely that your employer will offer you a similar pay package or even a similar role. And it may take a while before you’re back to earning what you are now.

    Related: Stay-at-home mum with no friends: Is that you? 

    (Photos: 123RF.com) 

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